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On the Road: Travels, Pilgrimages and Social Interaction

On the Road: Travels, Pilgrimages and Social Interaction, Passages from Antiquity to the Middle Age VI, University of Tampere, Finland, August 6–8, 2015

The sixth international Passages from Antiquity to the Middle Ages conference will focus on social approaches to travelling, mobility, pilgrimages, and cultural exchange. Interaction between society and space has been a key interest of scholars after the 'Spatial Turn'. Nevertheless, larger comparisons between eras and cultures are mainly missing.

The archetypal journey of Odysseys served as a metaphor and model for later narrations of travelling. In both Ancient and medieval worlds, religious reasons were significant motivations for travelling; these travels confront the traditional idea of these periods as eras of immobility. However, the challenges of setting out for a journey, as well as the dangers of the road, were not dependent on the incentive but rather on distance and other geographical settings, social status of the traveller, and political climate.

The conference aims at concentrating on social and cultural interaction before, during and after travelling. What kinds of motivations were there for ancient and medieval people to get on the road and what kind of negotiations and networks were inherent in travelling? We welcome papers, which have a sensitive approach to social differences: gender, age, health, and status. Actors, experiences and various levels of negotiations are of main interest, and our focus lies on society and the history of everyday life, on the differences and similarities between elite and popular culture, and on the expectations linked to gender and life cycle stage, visible in the practices and policies of travelling. We encourage proposals that integrate the theme of travelling into wider larger social and cultural contexts.

We aim at a broad coverage not only chronologically but also geographically and disciplinarily (all branches of Classical, Byzantine and Medieval Studies). Most preferable are contributions that have themselves a comparative and/or interdisciplinary viewpoint or focusing on a longue durée perspective.

A Sociolinguistic Approach to Late Byzantine History Writing

A Sociolinguistic Approach to Late Byzantine History Writing, Vienna, September 1–2, 2014

Even though ‘Style switching’, ‘Levels of style’, ‘Mimesis’ and ‘Intertextuality’ are familiar concepts to scholars of Byzantine philology, and have been explored as signs of a Byzantine author’s education (or lack of it), their pragmatic function has not drawn enough attention from modern scholars. Moreover, the target audience and the active role that it played in shaping texts have not been sufficiently appreciated.

This conference aims to approach late Byzantine history writing from a sociolinguistic point of view, which implies that even written literary texts have to be considered as a product of the relationships linking an author, his communicative purpose, the sociocultural context and his target audience. The workshop will focus on the reception of the milestones of historical sociolinguistics – from Romaine 1982 to Eckert 2012 – in the field of Byzantine philology and will address the challenging questions of whether and how the actual scientific debate in (historical) sociolinguistics may influence the hermeneutic of medieval Greek literature.

Assistant Professor, Art and Architecture of the Medieval World, UC-Santa Barbara

The Department of History of Art & Architecture, University of California, Santa Barbara, invites applications a tenure-track Assistant Professor position in Art and Architecture of the Medieval World beginning July 1, 2015.

We seek a colleague whose research makes new contributions to the understanding of cultural interchange in the medieval world. While the candidate’s research may focus on any medium and scale of analysis--painting, sculpture, illuminated manuscripts, architecture, and cities—we will expect the successful candidate to demonstrate a facility in exploring diverse media to engage larger issues related to social, political, and technological change in the medieval world.

Candidates are expected to have a Ph.D. in the history of art and/or architecture or a related discipline, with demonstrated excellence in research and teaching to complement the department’s global strengths in art and architecture and its Architecture & Environment Emphasis (see http://www.arthistory.ucsb.edu/). UC Santa Barbara encourages interdisciplinary studies and there will be opportunities for contributing to an Environmental Humanities initiative on campus, and for engaging with departments such History, and the Medieval Studies program. The successful candidate will be expected to teach a wide variety of courses ranging from undergraduate surveys to advanced graduate seminars. We are especially interested in candidates who can contribute to the diversity and excellence of the academic community through research, teaching and service.

Byzantium and the Middle Ages — Bosom Buddies or Uneasy Allies?

Byzantium and the Middle Ages — Bosom Buddies or Uneasy Allies?, BSANA sponsored session, International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, MI, May 14–17, 2015

Organizer: Richard Barrett, Indiana University

What is the right relationship of Byzantine studies as a discipline to the study of the Middle Ages? Is it a related, but parallel, field? A sub-discipline? Something else entirely? What is the best way for the relationship of Byzantine studies to medieval studies to be understood so that productive collaboration is maximized? What is the right scale for interaction – on an individual basis? Is a large conference like Kalamazoo big enough for Byzantium? This roundtable will involve a selection of scholars, including Byzantinists and non-Byzantinist medievalists, who will discuss the challenges and opportunities presented when the disciplines interact.

Byzantine studies makes for a somewhat awkward fit in settings generically intended for "medievalists". There are a number of factors that feed into this; first and foremost, perhaps, is a conception of the "Middle Ages" that privileges Latin and French subjects, particularly those that fall into the rather narrow window of time generally referred to as "high medieval". This means also that Byzantinists tend to face something of a language gap; while Byzantine studies requires a knowledge of Latin, Greek can be somewhat obscure for Western medievalists, and other languages that can factor into a discussion of Byzantine subjects - such as Syriac or Arabic - are even more so. This barrier of languages and sources can tend to isolate Byzantine subjects from Western medievalists. The result can be a ghettoization of Byzantine issues, placing them off to the side in medieval survey courses and textbooks. To the extent that the Byzantine world is talked about in those contexts, they are informed by biased Western sources such as Liutprand of Cremona, resulting in an Orientalizing overemphasis on the perceived differences between the "Byzantine east" and the "Latin west". The discourse emphasizes supposed cultural discontinuities - aesthetics, politics, art, religion, and so on - and discusses them as misunderstood, abstract distortions rather than as concrete realities. Byzantium, then, becomes something “byzantine” in the worst sense – an overly-complicated construct that is described variously as “mysterious”, “spiritual”, “mystical”, a gaudy red-headed stepchild of Western history cloaked in a cloud of incense rather than a fully-qualified subject of interest in its own right. This proposed roundtable, then, seeks to engage Byzantinists and Western medieval specialists together in a forward-looking discussion of how these fields may properly interact and collaborate.

We are looking for panel participants from a variety of disciplines and perspectives; please contact session organizer Richard Barrett to express your interest.

Urban and Sacred Topography of Prilep ­a Byzantine Town in the Balkans

Urban and Sacred Topography of Prilep ­a Byzantine Town in the Balkans, BSANA sponsored session, International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, MI, May 14–17, 2015

Organizer: Richard Barrett, Indiana University

Medieval Prilep, which in the Constantinopolitan literary circles had its apogee in George Akropolites' famous History as a background to his disastrous attempt to hold onto the Nicean stronghold in Central Balkans in the thirteenth century, deserves a serious study that will explore various aspects of its historical, social, economic, cultural and artistic achievements. Given the remarkable degree of preservation of the medieval fortress and more than a dozen churches and monasteries, the idea is to initiate a novel understanding of the urban fabric and sacred topography of this important Macedonian town during Late Antiquity and the Byzantine period.

The papers will provide a reassessment and contextualization of the Byzantine written sources on Prilep and a study of the remains of its material and visual culture, following the history of the town during the early Slavic expansion, the Latin incursions, the Despotate of Epirus, the Bulgarian and the Nicean conquests and the Serbian rule until the end of the 14th century, including the early Ottoman period. Topics will explore archaeology, history, art history, trade, warfare, topography and toponymy, all of which testify to the multi-ethnic and multi-confessional affiliation of Prilep’s medieval citizens.

The panel would ultimately contribute to the multidisciplinary research in the broader field of Byzantine studies and hopefully result in a publication to include comprehensive topics that would reveal Prilep as a testament to an amalgamation of different cultural and social identities.

Please send abstracts of no more than 250 words together with a completed Participant Information Form to session organizer Richard Barrett by September 15. Please include your name, title, and affiliation on the abstract itself. All abstracts not accepted for the session will be forwarded to Congress administrators for consideration in general sessions, as per Congress regulations.

The American School of Classical Studies at Athens NEH Fellowships

Founded in 1881, the American School of Classical Studies at Athens (ASCSA) is the most significant resource in Greece for American scholars in the fields of Greek language, literature, history, archaeology, philosophy, and art, from pre-Hellenic times to the present. It offers two major research libraries: the Blegen, with over 100,000 volumes dedicated to the ancient Mediterranean world; and the Gennadius, with over 120,000 volumes and archives devoted to post-classical Hellenic civilization and, more broadly, the Balkans and the eastern Mediterranean. The School also sponsors excavations and provides centers for advanced research in archaeological and related topics at its excavations in the Athenian Agora and Corinth, and it houses an archaeological laboratory at the main building complex in Athens. By agreement with the Greek government, the ASCSA is authorized to serve as liaison with the Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Tourism on behalf of American students and scholars for the acquisition of permits to conduct archaeological work and to study museum collections.

Since its inception in 1994, the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Fellowship program at the ASCSA has demonstrated its effectiveness by supporting projects for 43 scholars with distinguished research and teaching careers in the humanities.

Eligibility
Postdoctoral scholars and professionals in relevant fields including architecture or art who are US citizens or foreign nationals who have lived in the US for the three years immediately preceding the application deadline. Applicants must already hold their Ph.D. or equivalent terminal degree at the time of application. The ASCSA encourages younger scholars to apply.

NEH Fellows will be expected to reside primarily at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens (though research may be carried out elsewhere in Greece), contribute to and enhance the scholarly dialogue, as well as contribute to and expand scholarly horizons at the School.

Jacques Lefort (1939–2014)

Born in 1939, Jacques Lefort died in Paris on August 23, 2014, aged 75. A former Director of Studies at the École pratique des hautes études (IVe section), his interest in Byzantine studies was inspired by Paul Lemerle in 1959. His own pioneering works on rural economy, demography and society, medieval landscape, and the archives of Mount Athos left their mark in turn on another generation of scholars. In 2006, he looked back at his intellectual itinerary in the foreword to a volume of his collected studies (Société rurale et histoire du paysage à Byzance). Thereafter, in spite of a long illness, he contributed to the third volume of Le monde byzantin (1204–1453) (2011), produced an annotated translation of the Byzantine farmer’s manual Geoponika (2012), and most importantly, prepared the final volume of the Acts of the monastery of Vatopedi (in press). Editor or co-editor of the Acts of Esphigmenou (1973), Iviron (4 vols.; 1985–95) and Vatopédi (3 vols.; 2001–), he served as General Editor of the series Archives de l’Athos from 1989, succeeding Paul Lemerle. The characteristic rigour and thoroughness that he brought to this task earned him widespread acclaim among the international community of Byzantinists. His funeral will be held on August 28, 2014, in Lalleyriat, Jura, his native region. A memorial tribute will be held at the Collège de France in the fall.

Source: CFEB via BSANA facebook page

Byzantine Gold Medallion to be Auctioned by Roma Numismatics

Roma Numismatics Ltd. will auction a gold medallion struck as part of the wedding celebrations for the princess Charito, daughter of the emperor Tiberius II Constantine, to Germanus. The celebrations took place on or around Christmas Day in 583 CE. The medallion depicts scenes from the life of Christ—the Annunciation, Visitation, Nativity, and Ascension.

Saint Piroska/Eirene 880: Holiness and Power in Komnenian Constantinople

Saint Piroska/Eirene 880: Holiness and Power in Komnenian Constantinople, Central European University, November 24, 2014

Speakers:

Imperial Women and the Politics of Sanctity
Marianne Sághy (CEU)

Women and Power between Byzantium and Georgia
Sandro Nikolaishvili (CEU)

What Piroska/Eirene meant to John?
Max Lau (Oxford)

Manganeios Prodromos and the Hungarians
Michael Jeffreys (Oxford)

Non-domineering Political Manipulators? Imperial Women under the Komneni
Roberta Franchi (University of Waterloo)

Niels Gaul (CEU)
Etele Kiss (Hungarian National Museum)

What's in a (holy) name? Monastic onomastics and the pictoral sources for Piroska-Eirene of Hungary
Chris Mielke (CEU)

The Politics of (Female) Monastic Foundations in Komnenian Constantinople
Elif Demirtiken (CEU)

Piroska and the Pantokrator
Robert Ousterhout (U Penn)

A Scandal at the C.I.A. Maybe

Thomas Whittemore was a dashing and colorful archaeologist and preservationist, a mash-up of Indiana Jones, Oscar Wilde and Tom Wolfe. A prized dinner guest and an excellent fund-raiser, he was the founder of the deliciously named “Byzantine Institute, Inc.” (offices in Boston, Paris and Istanbul). He is remembered primarily as the man who convinced Mustafa Kemal Ataturk to let him preserve the mosaics of the Hagia Sophia.

Author David Schafer tells the story of how a collection of personal letters and papers belonging to his grandfather revealed his grandfather’s relationship with Thomas Whittemore and led Schafer to speculate that Whittemore was a C.I.A. agent.

Read the full post on The New York Times Opinionator blog.

National Humanities Center Fellowships

The National Humanities Center offers 40 residential fellowships for advanced study in the humanities for the period September 2015 through May 2016. Applicants must have doctorate or equivalent scholarly credentials. Young scholars as well as senior scholars are encouraged to apply, but they must have a record of publication, and new Ph.D.s should be aware that the Center does not normally support the revision of a doctoral dissertation. In addition to scholars from all fields of the humanities, the Center accepts individuals from the natural and social sciences, the arts, the professions, and public life who are engaged in humanistic projects. The Center is also international and gladly accepts applications from scholars outside the United States.

Areas of Special Interest
Most of the Center's fellowships are unrestricted. Several, however, are designated for particular areas of research. These include a fellowship for a young woman in philosophy and fellowships for environmental studies, English literature, art history, Asian Studies, and theology.

Stipends
Fellowships are individually determined, according to the needs of the Fellow and the Center's ability to meet them. The Center seeks to provide at least half salary and also covers travel expenses to and from North Carolina for Fellows and dependents.

Facilities and Services
Located in the Research Triangle Park of North Carolina, near Chapel Hill, Durham, and Raleigh, the Center provides an environment for individual research and the exchange of ideas. Its building includes private studies for Fellows, conference rooms, a central commons for dining, lounges, reading areas, a reference library, and a Fellows' workroom. The Center's noted library service delivers books and research materials to Fellows, and support for information technology and editorial assistance are also provided.

College Art Association Editorial Manager

The College Art Association (CAA) is dedicated to providing professional services and resources for artists, art historians, and students in the visual arts. CAA serves as an advocate and a resource for individuals and institutions nationally and internationally by offering forums to discuss the latest developments in the visual arts and art history through its Annual Conference, publications, exhibitions, website, and other programs, services, and events. CAA focuses on a wide range of advocacy issues, including education in the arts, freedom of expression, intellectual-property rights, cultural heritage and preservation, workforce topics in universities and museums, and access to networked information technologies. Representing its members’ professional needs since 1911, CAA is committed to the highest professional and ethical standards of scholarship, creativity, criticism, and teaching.

CAA is seeking a full-time Editorial Manager. This is an excellent opportunity for an arts/publishing professional to join a dedicated, collegial, and hard-working team. The ideal candidate has excellent writing and communication skills; is creative, detail-oriented, and well organized, and has 3+ years of experience in an educational, museum, or similar cultural institution. This position reports to the Director of Publications.

W.F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research 2015­–2016 Fellowships

The W.F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research in Jerusalem is now accepting applications for 2015­–2016.

Seymour Gitin Distinguished Professorship
$45,000 award for 9 months or $22,500 for 4.5 months. Room and half-board at the Institute is $1,078 per month and the remainder is stipend. Open to internationally recognized senior scholars of all nationalities who have made significant contributions to their field of study.

Annual Professorship
$15,000 award for 4.5 months. The stipend is $10,149; room and half-board is $4,851 for appointee at the Institute. Open to post-doctoral scholars, who are US citizens.

National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Fellowships
$50,400 available for up to three awards from 4 to 12 months. The award is $4,200 per month. The stipend is $3,122; room and half-board at the Institute is $1,078. Open to post-doctoral scholars who are U.S. citizens (or alien residents for at least three years).

George A. Barton Fellowship
$5,000 award for 2 months. The stipend is $2,844; room and half-board at the Institute is $2,156. Open to all doctoral students and recent Ph.D. recipients.

Carol and Eric Meyers Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship
$5,000 award for 2 months. The stipend is $2,844; room and half-board at the Institute is $2,156. Eligibility is for doctoral students whose research involves the study of archaeology and society in the biblical or early post-biblical periods. Topics dealing with society at the household level are encouraged.

CASVA A. W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship Program, 2015–2017

The Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts announces a postdoctoral fellowship supported by a grant from the A. W. Mellon Foundation. One fellowship is awarded each year for two consecutive academic years. The A. W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow will reside in Washington. During the first year the fellow will carry out research and writing for publication. The fellow will also design and direct an intensive weeklong seminar for the seven predoctoral fellows at the Center, focusing on a topic related to the applicant's field of interest and with a special emphasis on methodological issues. In the second academic year, while continuing research and writing in residence, the A. W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow will be expected to teach one course (advanced undergraduate or graduate) by arrangement at a neighboring university.

Field of Study
The A. W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship for 2015–2017 will support research in the history, theory, and criticism of the visual arts of any time period or culture.

Residency
The A. W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow will be in residence at the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts for two years and will participate fully in the activities of the Center throughout the fellowship period. The fellow will be provided with housing in an apartment near the Gallery, subject to availability. The postdoctoral fellow is also provided with a shared study. The fellow has access to the notable resources represented by the art collections, the library, and the image collections of the National Gallery of Art, as well as to the Library of Congress and other specialized research libraries and collections in the Washington area.

Qualifications and Selection
Applicants for 2015–2017 must have received the PhD degree between October 1, 2009, and October 1, 2014. The fellowship is awarded without regard to age or nationality of applicants. Applications are reviewed by an external selection committee composed of scholars in the history of art. Individuals currently affiliated with the National Gallery of Art are not eligible for the A. W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship program.

CASVA Visiting Senior Fellowship Program, 2015–2016

The Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts announces its program for Paul Mellon and Ailsa Mellon Bruce Visiting Senior Fellowships. Fellowships are for full-time research, and scholars are expected to reside in Washington and to participate in the activities of the Center throughout the fellowship period. Lectures, colloquia, and informal discussions complement the fellowship program. Each visiting senior fellow is provided with a study. In addition, visiting senior fellows who relocate to Washington are provided with housing in apartments near the Gallery, subject to availability. Visiting senior fellows have access to the notable resources represented by the art collections, the library, and the image collections of the National Gallery of Art, as well as to the Library of Congress and other specialized research libraries and collections in the Washington area.

Fields of Study
Paul Mellon and Ailsa Mellon Bruce Visiting Senior Fellowships are intended to support research in the history, theory, and criticism of the visual arts (painting, sculpture, architecture, landscape architecture, urbanism, prints and drawings, film, photography, decorative arts, industrial design, and other arts) of any geographical area and of any period. Visiting senior fellowship applications are also solicited from scholars in other disciplines whose work examines artifacts or has implications for the analysis and criticism of visual form.

Qualifications and Selection
Visiting senior fellowships are intended for those who have held the PhD for five years or more at the time of application, or who possess an equivalent record of professional accomplishment. Individuals currently affiliated with the National Gallery of Art are not eligible for the visiting senior fellowship program. Visiting senior fellowships are awarded without regard to the age or nationality of applicants. Applications are reviewed by an external selection committee composed of scholars in the history of art and related disciplines. Outside readers may assist in the evaluation of proposals.

CASVA Senior Fellowship Program, 2015–2016

The Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts announces its program for senior fellowships. Fellowships are for full-time research, and scholars are expected to reside in Washington and to participate in the activities of the Center throughout the fellowship period. Lectures, colloquia, and informal discussions complement the fellowship program. Each senior fellow is provided with a study. In addition, senior fellows who relocate to Washington are provided with housing in apartments near the Gallery, subject to availability. Senior fellows have access to the notable resources represented by the art collections, the library, and the image collections of the National Gallery of Art, as well as to the Library of Congress and other specialized research libraries and collections in the Washington area.

Fields of Study
The Paul Mellon and Ailsa Mellon Bruce Senior Fellowships are intended to support research in the history, theory, and criticism of the visual arts (painting, sculpture, architecture, landscape architecture, urbanism, prints and drawings, film, photography, decorative arts, industrial design, and other arts) of any geographical area and of any period. The Samuel H. Kress Senior Fellowships are intended to support research on European art before the early 19th century. The William C. Seitz Senior Fellowship is primarily intended to support research on modern and contemporary art. Senior fellowship applications are also solicited from scholars in other disciplines whose work examines artifacts or has implications for the analysis and criticism of form.

Qualifications and Selection
Senior fellowships are intended for those who have held the PhD for five years or more at the time of application, or who possess an equivalent record of professional accomplishment. Individuals currently affiliated with the National Gallery of Art are not eligible for the senior fellowship program. Senior fellowships are awarded without regard to the age or nationality of applicants. Applications are reviewed by an external selection committee composed of scholars in the history of art and related disciplines. Outside readers may assist in the evaluation of proposals.

Byzantium and the West: Perception and Reality (12th–15th c.)

Byzantium and the West: Perception and Reality (12th–15th c.), University of Athens, September 5–6, 2014

In the period from the twelfth to the fifteenth century the interaction between Byzantium and the Latin West was intimately connected to practically all the major events and developments which shaped the medieval world in the High and Late Middle Ages. The aim of the conference is to explore not only the actual avenues of interaction between the two sides (trade, political and diplomatic contacts, ecclesiastical dialogue, intellectual exchange, armed conflict), but also the image each side had of the other and the way perceptions evolved over this long period in the context of their manifold contact.

The event will be held under the auspices of the Department of History and Archaeology of the University of Athens and with the support of the National Hellenic Research Foundation.

The Sultan of Byzantium

International correspondent Peter Kenyon interviews Selçuk Altun, the author of The Sultan of Byzantium, as part of NPR’s Crime in the City series. In The Sultan of Byzantium, an academic living in Istanbul discovers that he is a descendant of the Constantine XI.

LISTEN

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Renovatio in the East Roman & Byzantine World, 395–1453

Renovatio in the East Roman & Byzantine World, 395–1453, Oxford University Byzantine Society proposed sponsored session, International Medieval Congress, Leeds, July 6–9, 2015

A blurred program of reform presented as renewal, renovatio was an extremely important concept for the Classical Roman Empire, and remained so for the entire history of its eastern continuation. As emperors sought to establish their legitimacy through issuing law codes, building programs, and reconquering lost lands, both the reality and the rhetoric of renovatio had a fundamental impact on the Byzantine view of themselves and their state. Evidence of these programs for restoration resonates today through out surviving texts, coins, and art and architecture, strongly influencing our historiographical reconstructions. We warmly invite papers dealing with these issues across the full lifespan of the Eastern Roman Empire and its successor states, from all areas of Late Antique & Byzantine studies. Suggested topics include:

  • Justinian and his World – Reconquest, Reform, and Renewal
  • Law and renovatio from the Theodosian Code to the Hexabiblos
  • Iconoclasm, the Isaurians, and the Resurgence of Byzantium
  • Rhetoric in Stone – Byzantine Architectural renovatio
  • A Macedonian Renaissance?
  • Literary renovatio – Historiography and the Greco-Roman Novel
  • The ‘Komnenian Restoration’
  • Art, Politics and renovatio in the post-1204 World

‘Rightly Dividing The Word Of Truth’: A Symposium in Honour of Metropolitan Kallistos of Diokleia

‘Rightly Dividing The Word Of Truth’: A Symposium in Honour of Metropolitan Kallistos of Diokleia, Madingley Hall, Cambridge, February 6–8, 2015

This conference is being held in honour of Metropolitan Kallistos of Diokleia who in September 2014 celebrates his eightieth birthday. He has been Chairman of the Friends of Mount Athos since the society’s foundation in 1990 and its President since 2000. Variously referred to as ‘the voice of Orthodoxy in the West’, ‘the closest approximation to an Athonite elder outside Athos’, and ‘the leading theologian in the Orthodox Church today’, Bishop Kallistos stands for many different things for many different people, but for every one of us he is a very special person. In its silver jubilee year the society calls on its members to join together in saluting the contribution of its internationally renowned leader and to listen to a series of presentations by his former students, colleagues, and friends.

THE PROGRAMME

There will be seven sessions spread over three days. On the first evening, after an inaugural dinner and a short welcoming address, there will be a ‘medley of tributes to His Eminence’. This will comprise six short (fifteen-minute) talks on some of the ways in which Metropolitan Kallistos has touched our lives: as spiritual father (by Frances Jennings); as teacher (Marcus Plested); as translator and writer (Fr Ephrem Lash); as pastor and bishop (Fr Stephen Platt); as theologian (Fr Andrew Louth); and as monk of Patmos (Fr Nikolai Sakharov). Each of the subsequent six sessions consists of a forty-minute presentation followed by discussion. The speakers will be:

  • Archdeacon John Chryssavgis (Archdeacon of the Ecumenical Patriarchate and formerly Professor of Theology at the Holy Cross Greek Orthodox School of Theology, Brookline, MA) on the theme ‘Philokalia: A Vocabulary for our Time’
  • Metropolitan Nikolaos (Hatzinikolaou) of Mesogaia (monk of Simonopetra) on ‘The Desert, Hesychia, and Askesis: Then and Now’
  • Archpriest John Behr (Dean of St Vladimir’s Seminary, New York) on ‘Patristic Texts as Icons’
  • Metropolitan Hilarion (Alfeyev) of Volokolamsk (Chairman of the Department of Foreign Church Relations of the Russian Orthodox Church) on ‘St Symeon the New Theologian and the Studite Monastic Tradition’
  • Metropolitan Kallistos (Ware) of Diokleia (President of the Friends of Mount Athos) on his ‘Fifty-four Years as an Athonite Pilgrim: Then and Now’
  • Lord (Rowan) Williams of Oystermouth (Master of Magdalene College, Cambridge, and formerly Archbishop of Canterbury) on ‘The One Face of Christ, the Many Faces of the Spirit’

Director, The Warburg Institute

The Warburg Institute possesses the most important library in the world dedicated to the afterlife of the classical tradition. It has a worldwide reputation for research and teaching in art history, medieval and renaissance studies, the afterlife of the classical tradition, and Arabic, medieval and renaissance philosophy

The Institute is located within the University of London's School of Advanced Study The School of Advanced Study is a unique institution in UK higher education.

Comprising ten postgraduate institutes and a variety of central academic initiatives, it is located within the Bloomsbury precinct of the University in the intellectual heart of London. It is the UK's national and international centre for the support, promotion and facilitation of research in the humanities, broadly defined. It does this in collaboration with other organisations, notably the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), the British Academy (BA), learned societies and government agencies.

A new Director for the Warburg Institute is sought to provide intellectual leadership, contribute to the vision of the Institute and sustain and develop the academic programme. Candidates must be able to demonstrate a track record of successful academic and managerial leadership and of securing external research funding.

They will be a scholar of international standing in an area of study relevant to the Institute and be able to communicate in at least one of the following languages: German, French, Italian. This is a professorial appointment and a secondment will be considered.

Roman in the Provinces: Art on the Periphery of Empire

Roman in the Provinces: Art on the Periphery of Empire, Yale University Art Gallery, August 22, 2014–January 4, 2015

The Roman Empire was vast and diverse, but the inhabitants of even its most far-flung provinces—Britain, Gaul, Turkey, Syria, Egypt, and Tunisia—were all, to some degree, “Roman.” Roman in the Provinces: Art on the Periphery of Empire examines the interaction between local traditions and Roman imperial culture through artifacts of daily life, politics, technology, and religion. The juxtaposition of mosaics, ceramics, sculpture, glass, textiles, coins, and jewelry presents a rich image of life in the Roman provinces. The exhibition features objects from across the empire, including works from Yale University’s excavations at Gerasa and Dura-Europos, many of which have rarely or never before been on view.

Migration and Displacement in the Medieval Mediterranean

Migration and Displacement in the Medieval Mediterranean, session at the International Medieval Congress, Leeds, July 6–9, 2015

Jochen Schenk (University of Glasgow) is seeking proposals for a session on “Human Migration and Displacement in the Medieval Mediterranean at the Time of the Holy Land Crusades (c.1050–c.1300),” to be held at “Reform and Renewal” — the International Medieval Congress at Leeds, 6–9 July 2015.

This session aims to look at the challenges posed to societies, governments and secular and religious institutions by the forced or voluntary migration of individuals, groups and populations within and across political and cultural boundaries in areas directly affected by the holy land crusades. Of particular interest in this context are the social and political mechanisms available or invented for dealing with refugees and otherwise displaced persons; the social and cultural costs (and benefits) of human displacement; challenged or shifting concepts of identity; human trafficking: its actors, victims and markets; the challenges posed to government by nomadic societies; migration and the labour market; the legal treatment of migrants and refugees; memories of migration and displacement.

The session is interdisciplinary and international in concept. Publication of a volume of essays is anticipated.

Franklin Research Grants, American Philosophical Society

Since 1933, the American Philosophical Society has awarded small grants to scholars in order to support the cost of research leading to publication in all areas of knowledge. In 2013–2014 the Franklin Research Grants program awarded $463,000 to 85 scholars, and the Society expects to make a similar number of awards in this year’s competition. The Franklin program is particularly designed to help meet the costs of travel to libraries and archives for research purposes; the purchase of microfilm, photocopies, or equivalent research materials; the costs associated with fieldwork; or laboratory research expenses.

Franklin grants are made for noncommercial research. They are not intended to meet the expenses of attending conferences or the costs of publication. The Society does not pay overhead or indirect costs to any institution. Grants will not be made to replace salary during a leave of absence or earnings from summer teaching; pay living expenses while working at home; cover the costs of consultants or research assistants; or purchase permanent equipment such as computers, cameras, tape recorders, or laboratory apparatus.

Special Programs Within the Franklin Research Grants

APS/British Academy Fellowship for Research in London
In collaboration with the British Academy, the APS offers an exchange postdoctoral fellowship for a minimum of one and a maximum of two months’ research in the archives and libraries of London during 2015. This award includes travel expenses between the United States and the United Kingdom and a monthly subsistence paid by the APS.

APS/Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities Fellowship for Research in Edinburgh
In collaboration with the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities (IASH) at the University of Edinburgh, the APS offers a visiting fellowship of between two and four months for research in Edinburgh in the calendar year 2015 in any aspect of the humanities and social sciences. To maximize the benefits of the fellowship, applicants are strongly encouraged to schedule their visit to overlap with one of the two main teaching semesters (January–March and September–December). This award includes travel expenses between the United States and the United Kingdom, a private office, library and research facilities at the IASH, and a monthly subsistence paid by the APS.

Eligibility
Applicants are expected to have a doctorate or to have published work of doctoral character and quality. Ph.D. candidates are not eligible to apply, but the Society is particularly interested in supporting the work of young scholars who have recently received the doctorate. Independent scholars and faculty members at all four-year and two-year research and non-research institutions are welcome to apply provided that all eligibility guidelines are met. American citizens and residents of the United States may use their Franklin awards at home or abroad. Foreign nationals not affiliated with a U.S. institution must use their Franklin awards for research in the United States. Applicants who have previously received a Franklin grant may reapply after an interval of two years.

Deadlines
October 1, for a January 2015 decision for work in February 2015 through January 2016
December 1, for a March 2015 decision for work in April 2015 through January 2016

Marco Institute Sponsored Sessions at Kalamazoo 2015

The Marco Institute of the University of Tennessee will be sponsoring two sessions at the 50th International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, MI, May 14–17, 2015.

Session #1: Mother and Other Tongues: Choices, Conflicts, Resistances

This session is concerned with linguistic options medieval authors or scribes may have had with respect to choosing their language of expression, vis-à-vis in particular, but not limited to, the usage of the mother tongue. The growing use of vernacular languages towards the end of the Middle Ages became a source of reflection, sometimes explicitly, regarding their status, forms, spheres of usage or one’s sense of belonging and identity. The choices that were made could have political, cultural, intellectual, territorial, gendered, or religious implications. We welcome papers that address any of these issues including aspects of language shifting or language contact phenomena, territorialization, diglossy, as well as discussions of linguistic minorities, or surprising/questionable linguistic choices made by authors in particular contexts. Approaches could include subjects of conflicts, structures of domination, or resistance to any form of cultural linguistic imposition.

Session #2: Celebrating Ten Years of the Marco Manuscript Workshop: Mind the Gaps

For the last ten years, the Marco Institute has sponsored its Manuscript Workshop, an annual gathering of scholars sharing their work on manuscripts and codicology in an informal collaborative setting. The guiding principle behind this program has been that scholars of all levels can better work through the thorny issues of textual scholarship with an engaged scholarly community, which can also open up new avenues of research for projects in development. The Marco-sponsored session “Mind the Gaps” will focus on understanding how readers interact with the physical layout of the page, script choice, or text-image interaction. “Mind the gaps” is open to papers covering topics like erasures, marginalia, missing portions, possible cases of censorship, or the disassembly and rebinding of manuscripts in the early modern period.

Lost Museums Colloquium

Lost Museums Colloquium, Brown University, Providence, RI,  May 7–8, 2015

In conjunction with the year-long exhibition project examining Brown University’s lost Jenks Museum, the John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage, the Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology, and the John Carter Brown Library invite paper proposals for a colloquium on lost artifacts, collections and museums. (Other formats—conceptual, poetic, and artistic—are also invited.) The colloquium will be held at Brown University, Providence, RI,  May 7 and 8, 2015.

Museums, perhaps more than any other institutions, think in the very long term: collections are forever. But the history of museums is more complicated than that. Museums disappear for many reasons, from changing ideas about what’s worth saving to the devastation of war. Museum collections disappear: deaccessioned, traded away, repatriated, lost to changing interests and the ravages of time.

We are interested in this process of decline and decay, the taphonomy of institutions and collections, as a way of shedding light not only on the history of museums and libraries, but also on the ways in which material things reflect and shape the practices of science and the humanities, and also to help museums think about current and future practices of collections and collections use.

We invite presentations from historians, curators, registrars, and collections managers, as well as from artists and activists, on topics including:

  • Histories of museums and types of museums: We welcome case studies of museums and categories of museums that are no more. What can we learn from museums that are no more? Cast museums, commercial museums, and dime museums have mostly disappeared. Cabinets of curiosity went out of and back into fashion. Why? What is their legacy?
  • Artifacts: How do specimens degrade? How have museums come to think of permanence and ephemerality? How do museums use, and “use up” collections, either for research (e.g., destructive sampling), or for education and display; how have they thought about the balance of preservation and use? How can they collect the ephemeral?
  • Museum collection history: How long does art and artifact really remain in the museum? Might the analysis of museum databases cast new light on the long-term history and use of collections?
  • “Lost and found” in the museum: How are art and artifacts “rediscovered” in museums? How do old collections regain their importance, both in artistic revivals and in new practices of “mining” the museum as artists finding new uses for old objects?
  • Museum collections policy: How have ideas about deaccessioning changed? How should they change? How do new laws, policies, and ethics about the repatriation of collections shape ideas about collections?
  • Museums going out of business: When a museum needs to close for financial or other reasons, what’s the best way to do that? Are there good case studies and legal and financial models?
  • The future of museum collections: How might museums think about collecting the ephemeral, or collecting for “impermanent” collections. What new strategies should museums consider for short-term collecting? How might digitization and scanning shape ideas about the permanence of collections?

Papers from the Colloquium may be published as a special issue of the Museum History Journal.

Pilgrimage, Exploration, and Travel

Pilgrimage, Exploration, and Travel, Hortulus sponsored session, 50th International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, MI, May 14–17, 2015

Hortulus will sponsor a session on “Pilgrimage, Exploration, and Travel,” a theme selected by our readers, at the 50th International Congress on Medieval Studies at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo, Michigan, May 14–17, 2015. Papers presented in our session may also be considered for our Fall 2015 issue on the same theme.

Scholarly interest in the topic of pilgrimage spans many geographies and disciplines. Additionally, recent scholarship has revealed the significant impact of pilgrimage and travel upon medieval people of a variety of religious, social, and regional backgrounds, not just the pilgrims themselves. We invite proposals that explore the topics of pilgrimage, exploration, and travel from multidisciplinary and comparative perspectives. Some potential topics for papers might include relics, badges, clothing, and associated material culture; perceptions of space, including landscape, geography, and architecture; the economics and politics of pilgrimage; pilgrimage narratives and other literary evidence; miracles and healing; readings of pilgrimage that consider monastic vs. lay approaches, social class, and gender; local and “national” identity; sacred journey in general (not just Christian) in the pre-modern world; liturgy and ritual of pilgrimage; and failed pilgrimages.

The Empire of the Palaiologoi: Ruin or Renewal?

The Empire of the Palaiologoi: Ruin or Renewal?, session at Leeds International Medieval Congress, July 6–9, 2015

The entry of Michael VIII Palaiologos into Constantinople in 1261 seemed to herald a new beginning for the Byzantine empire, consigning the shattering experience of the Fourth Crusade to the past. Initial hopes were soon dashed as the empire faced more enemies while disposing of fewer resources than ever before. Political, military, economic and ideological challenges were presented by the Latin west, the rising powers of the Muslim east and the newly independent nations of the Balkans. How successfully did Byzantines meet these challenges? Although it is easy to point to the empire’s ultimate demise, more recent scholars have shown that old narratives of decadence and decline are misguided. Astonishing feats of diplomacy and adaptation can be seen, as well as periods of intense intellectual, literary, theological and artistic energy. It was a period of new ideas, self-examination and unprecedented cultural engagement. But was the restoration doomed by unfavourable circumstances in a rapidly changing world, or were poor decisions by Byzantine elites to blame? How far were the Palaiologoi themselves, the most tenacious of all Byzantine dynasties, responsible?

Rethinking Medieval Maps

Rethinking Medieval Maps I and II, sessions at 50th International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, MI, May 14–17, 2015

Rethinking Medieval Maps I: The Unmapped, Marginalized and Fictitious

This panel is devoted to the cartography of spaces that are far—either geographically or conceptually—from the umbilicus terrae at Jerusalem and the seemingly well-known confines of Europe. Proposals are invited for papers that explore the less privileged aspects of medieval maps: the mapping of the unknown, negative space, and things omitted from maps; the inhabitants of the margins, monsters, and marginalized peoples; and the cartography of the fictitious or counterfactual. While we seek papers that engage closely with the details of the maps themselves, we welcome proposals that highlight new approaches to maps across time and space.

Rethinking Medieval Maps II: Evidence for the Use and Re-Use of Maps

P.D.A. Harvey has written that “Medieval Europe was a society that functioned largely without maps”—and we take this statement as a call for a closer look at how medieval Europeans engaged with maps when they did resort to them. What evidence do we have, either from maps themselves, their contexts, or from textual sources, about how medieval maps were used? What about cases in which maps were designed for one purpose, but employed for another? What do these uses and re-uses tell us about the place of maps in medieval society, and their connection with broader developments in visual or material culture?

Papers are expected to be amply illustrated with high-quality images of the maps discussed.

Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowships

ACLS invites applications for the ninth annual competition for the Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowships, which support a year of research and writing to help advanced graduate students in the humanities and related social sciences in the last year of PhD dissertation writing. The program encourages timely completion of the PhD. Applicants must be prepared to complete their dissertations within the period of their fellowship tenure and no later than August 31, 2016. A grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation supports this program.

ACLS will award 65 fellowships in this competition for a one-year term beginning between June and September 2015 for the 2015–16 academic year. The fellowship tenure may be carried out in residence at the fellow's home institution, abroad, or at another appropriate site for the research. These fellowships may not be held concurrently with any other fellowship or grant.

The total award of up to $38,000 includes a stipend plus additional funds for university fees and research support. In addition to the monetary support that the fellowship offers, Dissertation Completion Fellows are able to apply to participate in a seminar on preparing for the academic job market.  The seminar takes place over three days in the fall of the fellowship year.

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THE MARY JAHARIS CENTER
for Byzantine Arts and Culture

Founded in 2010 through a generous gift from the Jaharis Family Foundation, the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture is dedicated to the promotion and advancement of knowledge about the rich heritage of Byzantine art and culture.

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