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To publish or not to publish?

To publish or not to publish? A multidisciplinary approach to the politics, ethics and economics of ancient artifacts, The John Rylands Library, October 25, 2014

The event, organized by Dr. Roberta Mazza, currently Research Fellow of the John Rylands Research Institute, is part of the The John Rylands Research Institute Seminar in Papyrology.

Program
What does ‘provenance’ mean?
David Gill (University Campus Suffolk)
The role of academics
Neil Brodie (University of Glasgow)
Mesopotamian objects in a conflicted world
Stuart Campbell (University of Manchester)
Who owns the past? Private and public papyrus collections
Roberta Mazza (University of Manchester)
Association policies: the case of the Egypt Exploration Society
Chris Naunton (Egypt Exploration Society, London)
‘Working together.’ Law enforcement and cultural sector, intelligence sharing and cooperation
Vernon Rapley (V&A Museum, National Museum Security Group, London)
Dealers: trade, traffic and the consequences of demonization
James Ede (Charles Ede Ltd, London)
The way forward: round table
Discussants include David Trobisch (Director of the Museum of the Bible/Green Collection, Washington DC), Marcel Marée (The British Museum), Nikolaos Gonis (UCL), Campbell Price (Manchester Museum), Nicole Vitellone (University of Liverpool), William Webber (Art Loss Register), Donna Yates (University of Glasgow)

Aims of the seminar

Religious Conversion: History, Experience and Meaning

Ira Katznelson and Miri Rubin, eds. Religious Conversion: History, Experience and Meaning. Ashgate, 2014.

From Ashgate

Religious conversion - a shift in membership from one community of faith to another - can take diverse forms in radically different circumstances. As the essays in this volume demonstrate, conversion can be protracted or sudden, voluntary or coerced, small-scale or large. It may be the result of active missionary efforts, instrumental decisions, or intellectual or spiritual attraction to a different doctrine and practices. In order to investigate these multiple meanings, and how they may differ across time and space, this collection ranges far and wide across medieval and early modern Europe and beyond. From early Christian pilgrims to fifteenth-century Ethiopia; from the Islamisation of the eastern Mediterranean to Reformation Germany, the volume highlights salient features and key concepts that define religious conversion, particular the Jewish, Muslim and Christian experiences.

By probing similarities and variations, continuities and fissures, the volume also extends the range of conversion to focus on matters less commonly examined, such as competition for the meaning of sacred space, changes to bodies, patterns of gender, and the ways conversion has been understood and narrated by actors and observers. In so doing, it promotes a layered approach that deepens inquiry by identifying and suggesting constellations of elements that both compose particular instances of conversion and help make systematic comparisons possible by indicating how to ask comparable questions of often vastly different situations.

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Honor Frost Foundation Grants

The Honor Frost Foundation’s next deadline for HFF Grants is 1 October 2014 for projects in Marine and Maritime Archaeology with a regional focus on the Eastern Mediterranean.

Individual grants will not normally exceed £10,000. 

HFF Grants are available to independent scholars, affiliated scholars and institutions, and are intended to support or facilitate research projects covering any period or aspect of maritime archaeology. HFF grants can also support proposals that are involved with training, publications, workshops and conferences, conservation work, museum exhibitions, and public engagement and education in maritime archaeology. Applications from institutions and scholars based in the Eastern Mediterranean are particularly welcome with a focus on Cyprus, Lebanon and Western Syria. The HFF also gives preference to projects that show strong collaboration with regional partners and include local training opportunities.

Swenson Family Fellowships in Eastern Christian Manuscript Studies for Junior Scholars, HMML

The Swenson Family Fellowship in Eastern Christian Manuscript Studies, established in 2012, will be awarded semi-annually. The Fellowship was established by Dr. Gregory T. and Jeannette Swenson, with their son Nicholas Swenson.

The purpose of the Fellowship is to support residencies at HMML for graduate students or postdoctoral scholars with demonstrated expertise in the languages and cultures of Eastern Christianity. Awardees must be undertaking research on some aspect of Eastern Christian studies requiring use of the digital or microfilm manuscript collections at HMML. The program is specifically designed to aid new scholars in establishing themselves through research focused on manuscripts available through HMML. Postdoctoral scholars are understood to be those who at the time of application are within three years of being awarded a doctoral degree.

Awards will range from $2,500 - $5,000, based on project proposal and length of residency (two to six weeks). Funds may be applied toward travel to and from Collegeville, housing and meals at Saint John’s University, and costs related to duplication of HMML’s microfilm or digital resources. The Fellowship may be supplemented by other sources of funding but may not be held simultaneously with another HMML fellowship. Holders of the Fellowship must wait at least two years before applying again. At its discretion, HMML may choose to award more than one fellowship per cycle.

Applications must be submitted by November 15 for residencies between January and June of the following year.

Heckman Stipends, Hill Museum & Manuscript Library

Heckman Stipends, made possible by the A.A. Heckman Endowed Fund, are awarded semi-annually. Up to 10 stipends in amounts up to $2,000 are available each year. Funds may be applied toward travel to and from Collegeville, housing and meals at Saint John’s University, and costs related to duplication of HMML’s microfilm or digital resources. The Stipend may be supplemented by other sources of funding but may not be held simultaneously with another HMML Stipend or Fellowship. Holders of the Stipend must wait at least two years before applying again.

The program is specifically intended to help scholars who have not yet established themselves professionally and whose research cannot progress satisfactorily without consulting materials to be found in the collections of the Hill Museum & Manuscript Library.

Applications must be submitted by November 15 for residencies between January and June of the following year.

NEH Fellowships, American School of Classical Studies at Athens

Founded in 1881, the American School of Classical Studies at Athens (ASCSA) is the most significant resource in Greece for American scholars in the fields of Greek language, literature, history, archaeology, philosophy, and art, from pre-Hellenic times to the present. It offers two major research libraries: the Blegen, with over 100,000 volumes dedicated to the ancient Mediterranean world; and the Gennadius, with over 120,000 volumes and archives devoted to post-classical Hellenic civilization and, more broadly, the Balkans and the eastern Mediterranean. The School also sponsors excavations and provides centers for advanced research in archaeological and related topics at its excavations in the Athenian Agora and Corinth, and it houses an archaeological laboratory at the main building complex in Athens. By agreement with the Greek government, the ASCSA is authorized to serve as liaison with the Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Tourism on behalf of American students and scholars for the acquisition of permits to conduct archaeological work and to study museum collections.

Since its inception in 1994, the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Fellowship program at the ASCSA has demonstrated its effectiveness by supporting projects for 43 scholars with distinguished research and teaching careers in the humanities.

Eligibility
Postdoctoral scholars and professionals in relevant fields including architecture or art who are US citizens or foreign nationals who have lived in the US for the three years immediately preceding the application deadline. Applicants must already hold their Ph.D. or equivalent terminal degree at the time of application. The ASCSA encourages younger scholars to apply.

Terms
Two to four fellowships, either five or ten months in duration. Stipend for a five-month project, $21,000; for a ten-month project, $42,000. Term must coincide with American School’s academic year, September to June. School fees are waived, and the award provides lunches at Loring Hall five days per week. The NEH Fellow will pay for travel costs, housing, partial board, residence permit, and other living expenses from the stipend. A final report is due at the end of the award period, and the ASCSA expects that copies of all publications that result from research conducted as a Fellow of the ASCSA be contributed to the relevant library of the School. The NEH Fellow is required to send one copy of all books and electronic copies of articles to the NEH.

NEH Fellows will be expected to reside primarily at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens (though research may be carried out elsewhere in Greece), contribute to and enhance  the scholarly dialogue, as well as contribute to and expand  scholarly horizons at the School.

Application
Submit Senior Associate Membership application with fellowship online on the ASCSA website.

Between Empires: Negotiating Identity on the Veneto-Ottoman Frontier

Between empires: negotiating identity on the Veneto-Ottoman frontier, lecture by Milena Grabacic, King’s College London, November 18, 2014, at 5:30 pm

Focusing on several court cases from areas as diverse as Nauplion, Bocca di Cattaro and Venice, this seminar will trace the movement of both individuals and communities across the Mediterranean, in order to propose a framework for thinking about what it meant to live in-between empires in the fifteenth century. Rather than privileging either the metropolitan or colonial perspective, light will be shed on precise strategies used by individuals and communities alike to engage with the Venetian state and make claims about identity, social membership and the empire. The image that emerges is one where historical agency is not always on the side of the state and its military power, but rather where individuals navigate between overlapping legal and political systems, and where international norms take shape not in the Venetian metropolis, but at the edges, passages and corridors of the Mediterranean Sea.

Milena Grabacic studied Byzantine studies, medieval history and art history at the universities of Belgrade and Oxford. Her doctoral thesis examined the intersection of religion and politics in Venice’s Stato da Mar in order to show how religious devotion was used to reinforce, negotiate and challenge colonial relations between the Venetian state and its culturally, ethnically and linguistically diverse subjects. Milena was a lecturer in late medieval history at Wadham and St John’s Colleges, Oxford, and convened the Medieval Visual Culture Seminar at the University of Oxford. She is now embarking on a new project which draws on anthropological methods to study the everyday life of various groups of foreigners in fifteenth-century Venice.

12th International Conference on Greek Linguistics (ICGL12)

12th International Conference on Greek Linguistics (ICGL12), Berlin, September 16–19, 2015

The Chair for Modern Greek Studies and the Center for Modern Greece (CeMoG), both at the Freie Universität Berlin (FU Berlin), are pleased to announce the 12th International Conference on Greek Linguistics (ICGL12). The International Conference on Greek Linguistics is a biennial meeting on the study and analysis of Greek (Ancient, Medieval and Modern), placing particular emphasis on the later stages of the language. ICGL12 will take place at the Seminarzentrum of the FU (Otto-von-Simson-Str. 26, 14195 Berlin, Germany) from 16 to 19 September 2015.

Papers in all areas of linguistic analysis (applied linguistics, computational linguistics, conversation analysis, corpus linguistics, dialectology, discourse analysis, historical linguistics, morphology, neurolinguistics, phonetics, phonology, pragmatics, psycholinguistics, semantics, sociolinguistics, syntax, etc.) focusing on any period in the history of the Greek language are welcome.

The Conference will also host a small number of thematic workshops (up to six) and a poster session.

SIEPM Colloquium Proposal 2015: Tolerance and Concepts of Otherness in Medieval Philosophy

SIEPM Colloquium Proposal 2015: Tolerance and Concepts of Otherness in Medieval Philosophy, Maynooth University, Ireland, September 9–12, 2015

Tolerance (and of course intolerance) and identity play key roles in our interaction with the world and the other. In fact, due to recent social and political developments, the focus of Philosophy has shifted more and more towards the problem of both inter-religious and inter–cultural dialogue and its limitations. An extremely fruitful source in order to gain a more precise understanding of the questions and problems that arise in the encounter with otherness are the reflections developed by philosophers in the Middle Ages within their respective religious and cultural contexts. This colloquium aims to examine the development of the perception of the other within the different philosophical, religious and cultural traditions by considering not only the theological background but also the philosophical presuppositions of the concepts which then were used to develop various apologetic writings and theological treatises in the late Middle Ages and Early Modern era that dealt with the questions of cultural and religious difference.

Conference papers may be presented in English, French, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese or German. Discussions of papers at the conference may also occur in English, French, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese or German (translators will be provided for the papers and questions during sessions in these languages, if required).

To facilitate attendance at the Annual Colloquium, Brepols-SIEPM stipends are available for researchers under the age of 35 or from low-currency countries.

2015 Rome Prize, American Academy in Rome

Each year, the Rome Prize is awarded to about thirty emerging artists and scholars who represent the highest standard of excellence and who are in the early or middle stages of their working lives.

Rome Prize recipients are generally invited to Rome for eleven months (some design fellowships are six months and some pre-doctoral art history fellowships are two years).

The Rome Prize consists of room and board, a stipend and separate work space, and privileged access to Rome.

Rome Prize winners are the core of the Academy's residential community, which also includes Affiliated Fellows, Residents and Visiting Artists and Visiting Scholars.

Eligibility
Applicants for all Rome Prize fellowships, except those applying for the National Endowment for the Humanities post-doctoral fellowship, must be United States citizens at the time of the application.

Religion and Trade: Cross-Cultural Exchanges in World History, 1000–1900

Francesca Trivellato, Leor Halevi, and Catia Antunes, eds. Religion and Trade: Cross-Cultural Exchanges in World History, 1000–1900. Oxford University Press, 2014.

From Oxford University Press

Although trade connects distant people and regions, bringing cultures closer together through the exchange of material goods and ideas, it has not always led to unity and harmony. From the era of the Crusades to the dawn of colonialism, exploitation and violence characterized many trading ventures, which required vessels and convoys to overcome tremendous technological obstacles and merchants to grapple with strange customs and manners in a foreign environment. Yet despite all odds, experienced traders and licensed brokers, as well as ordinary people, travelers, pilgrims, missionaries, and interlopers across the globe, concocted ways of bartering, securing credit, and establishing relationships with people who did not speak their language, wore different garb, and worshipped other gods.

Religion and Trade: Cross-Cultural Exchanges in World History, 1000-1900 focuses on trade across religious boundaries around the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic and Indian Oceans during the second millennium. Written by an international team of scholars, the essays in this volume examine a wide range of commercial exchanges, from first encounters between strangers from different continents to everyday transactions between merchants who lived in the same city yet belonged to diverse groups. In order to broach the intriguing yet surprisingly neglected subject of how the relationship between trade and religion developed historically, the authors consider a number of interrelated questions: When and where was religion invoked explicitly as part of commercial policies? How did religious norms affect the everyday conduct of trade? Why did economic imperatives, political goals, and legal institutions help sustain commercial exchanges across religious barriers in different times and places? When did trade between religious groups give way to more tolerant views of "the other" and when, by contrast, did it coexist with hostile images of those decried as "infidels"?

Exploring captivating examples from across the world and spanning the course of the second millennium, this groundbreaking volume sheds light on the political, economic, and juridical underpinnings of cross-cultural trade as it emerged or developed at various times and places, and reflects on the cultural and religious significance of the passage of strange persons and exotic objects across the many frontiers that separated humankind in medieval and early modern times.

2015–2017 Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Humanities, MIT

Thanks to the generous support of the Mellon Foundation, MIT's School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences awards two fellowships each year to promising young scholars working at the intersection of humanities disciplines, or between the humanities and other disciplines. This Fellowship is especially intended for scholars who work in more than one specialty within the humanities, or bridging from the humanities with other disciplines.

Terms of Appointment
The School of Humanities, Arts, and, Social Sciences has four departments participating in this search: Comparative Media Studies/Writing, Literature, Global Studies and Languages, Music and Theater Arts. Applicants must designate one of the four academic units in which they would like to be located. Appointments will be for two years, effective July 1, 2015. Fellows will teach one course in Spring 2016 and one per semester the following academic year, and will be in residence at MIT during this time. The salary will be $63,000 per year with standard benefits, and each Fellow will receive a research fund of $1,000 to cover travel and other costs associated with research and professional development.

Eligibility and Selection
To be eligible for the positions, applicants must have received their Ph.D. no earlier than July 1, 2012 and no later than July 1, 2015. If you have not earned your degree at the time you apply for the fellowship, we require an attached Letter of Certification from your institution's Registrar’s Office, Department of Graduate Studies, or your Department Head, to confirm that you are expected to be formally awarded your degree by July 1, 2015. Please make sure that your letter writer specifies the date of your expected conferral date. Applicants who have not been formally awarded their degree by July 1, 2015 will not be considered. Fellows may not hold other appointments throughout the duration of the Fellowship. Applicants must have received their degrees from institutions other than MIT. International scholars will be considered for the position, but fellowships are contingent upon eligibility to legally work within the United States. MIT will offer a J1 visa sponsorship if needed. The Mellon Selection Committee will announce the Fellows in April 2015.

Assistant Professor of History of the Pre-Modern World, University of New Hampshire

The Department of History at the University of New Hampshire invites applications for a tenure- track assistant professorship in the history of the pre-modern world (i.e. from antiquity to approximately 1000 CE). Although the area and period of concentration is open, the department is especially interested in candidates whose scholarship examines integrating themes in world history, with particular attention to Late Antiquity.

Information on the Department of History  

The person hired will have a doctoral degree in hand by the beginning of the appointment in August 2015.

The person hired will be expected to show promise of scholarly excellence, as well as a commitment to teaching at every level, from introductory surveys to advanced undergraduate and graduate courses. 

Application review will begin on October 15, 2014.

Past in the Present: A Living Heritage Approach - Meteora, Greece

Ioannis Poulios. Past in the Present: A Living Heritage Approach - Meteora, Greece. London: Ubiquity Press, 2014.

From Ubiquity Press

The Past in the Present deals with the complexities in the operation and management of living heritage sites. It presents a new interpretation of such sites based on the concept of continuity, and its evolution to the present. It is demonstrated that the current theoretical framework and practice of conservation, as best epitomised in a values-based approach and the World Heritageconcept, is based on discontinuity created between the monuments(considered to belong to the past) and the people of the present, thus seemingly unable to embrace living heritage sites. From this position, the study suggests an innovative approach that views communities and sites as an inseparable entity: a Living Heritage Approach. This approach brings a new insight into key concepts such as authenticity and sustainable development. Through the use of the monastic site of Meteora, Greece, as a case study, the discussion generated aims to shift the focus of conservation from ‘preservation’ towards a continual process of ‘creation’ in an ongoing present, attempting to change the way heritage is perceived, protected and, more importantly, further created.

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2015–2016 Art History Fellowships, Metropolitan Museum of Art

The Metropolitan Museum of Art offers fellowships in art history for PhD candidates, postdoctoral researchers, and senior museum professionals. Predoctoral art history fellows, with the exception of Theodore Rousseau fellows, can be asked to assist the hosting curatorial departments with projects that complement their approved scholarly subject. Not all departments request this assistance. Senior fellows are generally expected to spend all of their time on their approved fellowship projects. However, if a senior fellow would like to contribute a portion of his or her time to the department it is usually welcomed.

All fellows, with the exception of Theodore Rousseau fellows, must be in residence at the Metropolitan Museum during the fellowship period. All fellowships must take place between September 1, 2015, and August 31, 2016. Fellowships generally begin in September. The number of fellowships awarded depends on funds available; the stipend amount for one year is $42,000 for senior fellows and $32,000 for predoctoral fellows, with up to an additional $6,000 for travel (maximum of six weeks). Health care benefits are included. Senior fellowships are intended for those who hold a PhD on the date of application and for well-established scholars.

Ancients and Moderns: Reconsidering Style in the Visual Arts of Late Antiquity

Ancients and Moderns: Reconsidering Style in the Visual Arts of Late Antiquity, lecture by Sarah E. Bassett, University of Indiana, Bloomington, Dumbarton Oaks, September 25, 2014, at 6:15 pm

Roman art in the period between Augustus and Justinian follows a formal trajectory that moves from “naturalism” to “abstraction.” This formal shift is, in turn, symptomatic of a larger change in cultural orientation, one that is understood to abandon the corporeal and the rational in favor of the incorporeal and the spiritual. The aim of this lecture is to examine this formula. It will begin by identifying the origin of the equation of naturalism with rationality and abstraction with spirituality in the modern critical and historiographic traditions of the early 20th century. From there, it will explore the ways in which this intellectual construct has guided the modern evaluation and understanding of late antique art. Finally, it will consider the possibility of an alternative critical language, one rooted in the late antique vocabularies of rhetoric and literary criticism, with the aim of suggesting how the use of such terminology might shape new understandings of late antique art and visual experience.

Sarah Bassett is Associate Professor of Medieval Mediterranean Art in the Department of the History of Art at Indiana University. Her research focuses on the art and architecture of the late antique and Byzantine worlds. She is the author of The Urban Image of Late Antique Constantinople (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004), a study of the reuse of ancient sculpture for public display in the early Byzantine capital. Other publications include articles in the American Journal of Archaeology, the Art Bulletin, Artibus et Historiae, Dumbarton Oaks Papers, and Greek, Roman and Byzantine Studies.  Her current work investigates purpose-made honorific sculpture in Constantinople, early Christian icons, and the use and understanding of style in late antique art. She has received support for this work from the American Research Institute in Turkey, Dumbarton Oaks, and the National Endowment for the Humanities

RSVP at FellowshipPrograms@doaks.org.

Rus’ and Mount Athos: a Millennium of Spiritual and Cultural Ties

Rus’ and Mount Athos: a Millennium of Spiritual and Cultural Ties, Chernihiv, Ukraine, November 28–29, 2014

The aim of the Rus’ and Mount Athos: a Millennium of Spiritual and Cultural Ties Conference is to act as a springboard for the sharing of experience, for systematic and varied discussion, and the study and propagation of the legacy, history and influence of Mount Athos on the spiritual growth, culture, philosophy, art and literature of the peoples of Eastern and South-Eastern Europe (Belarus, Bulgaria, Georgia, Greece, Lithuania, Moldova, Poland, Romania, Russia, Serbia, and Ukraine), as well as on the Christian East. Also on the agenda will be the significance of the Holy Mountain and its legacy in the inter-cultural dialogue in these countries, and their interrelationship and contribution to the shared treasures of Mount Athos.

The conference is dedicated to the millennium of Russian Athonite monasticism and to the 220th anniversary of the falling asleep of St Paisy Velichkovsky (☩ 28 November 1794), the prominent Athonite ascetic, public figure and writer, who left an indelible imprint on the spiritual and cultural life of Ukraine, Greece, Russia, Romania and Moldova.

Postdoctoral Fellowship: Power and Institutions in Medieval Islam and Christendom

A 14 months Postdoctoral position (Experienced Researcher) is available in the Marie Curie Initial Training Network PIMIC. The Postdoctoral position will be based in an audiovisual company (Lopez Li Films-Spain). The Fellow will receive an annual living allowance of 57,000 Euros/year (base rate) and a mobility allowance of 700-900 Euros/month (base rate). She/he will participate in PIMIC, a project combining academic research on medieval institutions with training in wider dissemination, based on collaboration between universities and private sector companies and funded by the European Union.

The Experienced Researcher will participate in a groundbreaking project: the creation of the Media School for Historians, a training course designed to teach historians how to make a documentary film from its conception to post-production. She/he will work actively with Lopez-Li Films in order to get familiar with the company and its productions. She/he will equally enable the Marie Curie Initial Training Network PIMIC to implement ambitious schemes for the diffusion and transfer of its conclusions.

Required skills: Ph.D or at least 4 years of research experience with specific studies related to audiovisual media, film, communication, cultural management and/or applied media sciences. Some educational background in History is a plus. Experience on documentary production will be appreciated.

Languages: English and Spanish

Digital Philology: A Journal of Medieval Cultures

Digital Philology: A Journal of Medieval Cultures reveals alternative modes of contact for medieval scholars, librarians, and archivists specializing in medieval studies and medieval texts, made possible by the emergence of digital resources and by engagement with the digital humanities. The journal's global and interdisciplinary perspective pushes traditional national and temporal boundaries as the first such publication linking peer-reviewed research and scholarship with digital libraries of medieval manuscripts. Digital Philology includes scholarly essays, manuscript studies, and reviews of relevant resources such as websites, digital projects, and books.

Digital Philology is welcoming submissions. Inquiries and articles may be sent to the attention of the Managing Editor. Correspondence regarding manuscript studies may be addressed to Jeanette Patterson. For reviews of digital projects and publications, please contact Timothy Stinson.

Source: The Medieval Academy Blog

Getty Pre- and Postdoctoral Fellowships 2015–2016

Getty Predoctoral and Postdoctoral Fellowships are intended for emerging scholars to complete work on projects related to the Getty Research Institute's annual theme. Recipients are in residence at the Getty Research Institute, where they pursue research to complete their dissertations or to expand them for publication. Fellows make use of the Getty collections, join in a weekly meeting devoted to the annual theme, and participate in the intellectual life of the Getty.

ANNUAL RESEARCH THEMES

Art and Materiality (Research Institute)
In the past decade, a greater attention to the art object and its materiality has enhanced the study of art history, opening new avenues of investigation. Combined with more historical methodologies, the focus on the materiality of artworks is offering profound insights into their meanings. Artists across time and space have infused materials not only with ritual and symbolic significance but also social, political, and economic functions. Art historians, increasingly in collaboration with conservators and scientists, are gaining insight into the process of art making from raw material to finished object, the chaîne opératoire, as well as the strategic deployment of materials both for their aesthetic qualities and for their power to signify. The inquiry into an artwork's materiality raises questions about procurement, trade, value, and manufacturing on the one hand, and, on the other, about the materiality of mechanically reproduced objects or of ephemeral, durational, and conceptual works. Finally, as artworks move between cultures, their materials—whether feathers, shells, marble, or oil paint—are given new meanings, thereby accumulating additional interpretive layers.

The Getty Research Institute invites proposals from scholars and fellows on these and other issues related to the materiality of art.

The Classical World in Context: Egypt (Villa)
From the Bronze Age through late antiquity, the cultures of the classical world have interacted with the surrounding civilizations of the Mediterranean, Near East, and beyond through trade, warfare, diplomacy, cultural exchange, and other forms of contact. These interactions had a crucial, and often reciprocal, impact on cultural trajectories in both spheres. In the first of a series of scholarly programs and related exhibitions exploring these interconnections, the 2015–2016 Getty Villa scholars will focus on relations between the cultures of the classical world and Egypt from prehistory to the coming of Islam. Priority will be given to research projects that are cross-cultural and interdisciplinary, utilizing a wide range of archaeological, textual, anthropological, and other evidence.

Getty Scholar Grants 2015–2016

Getty Scholar grants are for established scholars, or writers who have attained distinction in their fields. Recipients are in residence at the Getty Research Institute, where they pursue their own projects free from academic obligations, make use of Getty collections, join their colleagues in a weekly meeting devoted to an annual theme, and participate in the intellectual life of the Getty.

ANNUAL RESEARCH THEMES

Art and Materiality (Research Institute)
In the past decade, a greater attention to the art object and its materiality has enhanced the study of art history, opening new avenues of investigation. Combined with more historical methodologies, the focus on the materiality of artworks is offering profound insights into their meanings. Artists across time and space have infused materials not only with ritual and symbolic significance but also social, political, and economic functions. Art historians, increasingly in collaboration with conservators and scientists, are gaining insight into the process of art making from raw material to finished object, the chaîne opératoire, as well as the strategic deployment of materials both for their aesthetic qualities and for their power to signify. The inquiry into an artwork's materiality raises questions about procurement, trade, value, and manufacturing on the one hand, and, on the other, about the materiality of mechanically reproduced objects or of ephemeral, durational, and conceptual works. Finally, as artworks move between cultures, their materials—whether feathers, shells, marble, or oil paint—are given new meanings, thereby accumulating additional interpretive layers.

The Getty Research Institute invites proposals from scholars and fellows on these and other issues related to the materiality of art.

The Classical World in Context: Egypt (Villa)
From the Bronze Age through late antiquity, the cultures of the classical world have interacted with the surrounding civilizations of the Mediterranean, Near East, and beyond through trade, warfare, diplomacy, cultural exchange, and other forms of contact. These interactions had a crucial, and often reciprocal, impact on cultural trajectories in both spheres. In the first of a series of scholarly programs and related exhibitions exploring these interconnections, the 2015–2016 Getty Villa scholars will focus on relations between the cultures of the classical world and Egypt from prehistory to the coming of Islam. Priority will be given to research projects that are cross-cultural and interdisciplinary, utilizing a wide range of archaeological, textual, anthropological, and other evidence.

Cyprus and the Balance of Empires: Art and Archaeology from Justinian I to the Coeur de Lion

Charles Anthony Stewart, Thomas W. Davis and Annemarie Weyl Carr, eds. Cyprus and the Balance of Empires: Art and Archaeology from Justinian I to the Coeur de Lion. American Schools of Oriental Research, 2014.

From ASOR

Between 491 and 1191 AD, Cyprus was influenced by various political and cultural centers that vied for dominance in the Eastern Mediterranean. This collection of essays primarily focuses on the island's archaeology when it was governed by the Byzantine capital of Constantinople. Greek and Orthodox Christian identity was cultivated during this period, which provided a sense of unity among the various provinces; and yet, the surviving historical and archaeological data concerning Cyprus is unique in that it expresses both local and regional characteristics. By investigating the various threads, whether textual, numismatic, architectural, or artistic, narrative has emerged that challenges our past assumptions.

The themes covered in this volume developed from a conference held in Nicosia, organized by the Cyprus American Archaeological Research Institute [CAARI] celebrating the 50th year anniversary of the Republic of Cyprus. An international group of experts explored several themes such as: the impact of recent archaeological discoveries; the shift from studying Late Antique urbanism to rural development; indicators of Cypriot identity; shifts in population settlement, production, and trade; cultural interaction between Islam and Christianity; the significance of ceramic and numismatic evidence; monumental figural arts and their iconographical interpretation. The resulting chapters provide new and previously unpublished data, and should be considered a major contribution to Late Antique and Medieval studies.

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Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia Research Fellowship

The Department of Humanities, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, is offering a 12-month research fellowship aimed at the preparation or completion of a critical edition with commentary if Greek epigrams from late antiquity, either literary or inscriptional. The epigrams may either be the work of one poet, or a corpus from different authors, selected on the grounds of thematic affinities.

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Medieval Greek Liturgy and Liturgical Art, a Study Day

Medieval Greek Liturgy and Liturgical Art: an exploration of the interaction between art and experience in religious life, British Museum, Sackler Room B, October 31, 2014

The Society for the Promotion of Byzantine Studies and the British Museum present Medieval Greek Liturgy and Liturgical Art: an exploration of the interaction between art and experience in religious life. This event examines the interaction between developments in liturgies (church ceremonies, hymns and processionals) and liturgical art (icons, crosses, church decoration) using a combination of presentations and the examination of liturgical art at the British Museum to explore the interaction between art and experience in religious life.

Program
Introduction
Liz James
Liturgical celebration of Mary, the Mother of God, in the Middle Byzantine period: the interaction between Church hymnography and devotional art
Mary Cunningham
Public Involvement in Early Byzantine (Para)Liturgical Practices: Participation in Hymns and Prayers in Churches and Elsewhere
Arik Avdokhin
Liturgy in Space
Nadine Schibille
Handling Session
C. Entwistle
Mirroring Heaven: The Experience of Eucharistic Silverware in Early Byzantium
Heather Hunter-Crawley
Monumental decoration in relation to the liturgy
Cecily Hennessy
The 14th century icon of the Triumph of Orthodoxy in the British Museum and the broader question of how to discover the use of icons in the liturgy
Robin Cormack

Cost
£15 for SPBS members
£20 for non-members

Columbia Global Seminar in Istanbul: Byzantine and Modern Greek Encounters

Building upon its existing relationship with Bogaziçi University and the Global Center, Columbia University is developing a new spring 2015 program in which students anchor their studies in Istanbul byHaiga Sofia Istanbul participating in two Columbia-style seminars taught by two distinguished Columbia faculty. The two seminars, composed of not more than 15 American, Turkish, and Greek students, will be taught consecutively in condensed sessions over the spring term. Although distinctive in their subject matter and disciplinary approach, each addresses the question of how, from the Middle Ages to the present, westerners have interpreted and incorporated features of Greek culture. The first course will explore the history of western Europeans’ relationship to Byzantine culture when Constantinople reigned as a cultural capital of Christendom; the second examines how the World has responded to Greece at the crossroads of East and West since the Fall of Constantinople with literature as its main lens for reading culture.
 
“Byzantine Encounters,” taught during the first half of the term, examines the experience and reactions of western European travelers, traders, and warriors in Constantinople during the Middle Ages, prior to and immediately after the Ottoman conquest of 1453 and continuing into the early years of the European Renaissance.  Readings will include narrative sketches of the history of the period, critical literature examining key instances of encounter, and primary sources produced by westerners that record their impressions of and experiences in Constantinople. The classroom experience will be enhanced by extracurricular visits to monuments in Istanbul that display key features of Byzantine and early Ottoman culture.
 
“The World Responds to the Greeks,” taught in the second half of the term, foregrounds moments in literary history and the history of representational forms when Greece’s position at the crossroads –Byzantine and Ottoman; Ancient and Modern; the Balkans and Europe; Greece, Cyprus and Turkey; and Greece and America – become comparatively productive in various fields (Literature, History, Sociology, Film, Architecture, Anthropology). Students will have the opportunity to read works by writers and scholars from the region as well as to meet and discuss their work with them.  In both courses, students will be asked to consider how questions are shaped by different sources and how the interpretation of these sources may vary depending on the disciplinary approach.
To help navigate their encounters in modern-day Istanbul, students also enroll in a Turkish language course and choose at least one elective course from the broad range of Bogaziçi University course offerings.

Eligibility
Must be a currently enrolled undergraduate student in good academic standing at Columbia or another institution. Students from other institutions are welcome to apply.

New issue of Archiv für Papyrusforschung und verwandte Gebiete

Archiv für Papyrusforschung und verwandte Gebiete 60, issue 1 (September 2014).

CONTENTS INCLUDE

Frustula Beineckiana
Amin Benaissa

Publication of six papyrus fragments in the Beinecke Library dating from late antiquity: an administrative letter probably relating to the transport of the grain tax to Alexandria (1); a work contract from Oxyrhynchus (2); a loan of three artabas of wheat (3); an Arsinoite loan or sale on delivery of 17 kouri of wine mentioning an ‘estate of Epiphanius’( 4); scribal practice with peculiar invocation and dating formula from the reign of Phocas (5); a receipt between monks of the Apa Apollo and Apa Anuphius monasteries in Bawit (6).

Patched and Peeled in London: A Memorandum for a Trip to Constantinople (P.Lond. inv. 2237)
Michael W. Zellmann-Rohrer

Edition of a Byzantine memorandum in the form of a short letter. The text gives instructions for a private individual who is traveling to Constantinople, including the delivery of correspondence. There is evidence that the papyrus was repaired both in antiquity and by a modern antiquities dealer.

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Accounts of Medieval Constantinople: The Patria

Thus the Patria, which do not stint on commentary, are fleshed out, offering a much more expansive account at a much later date. Berger's translation now makes both this city and its interpretation available to a new audience.

Albrecht Berger. Accounts of Medieval Constantinople: The Patria. Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library, 24. Cambridge, MA; London: Harvard University Press, 2013.

From the Bryn Mawr Classical Review (BMCR). Review by Sarah Bassett, Indiana University

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From Byzantine to Islamic Egypt: Religion, Identity and Politics After the Arab Conquest

Maged S. A. Mikhail. From Byzantine to Islamic Egypt: Religion, Identity and Politics After the Arab Conquest. I.B. Tauris, 2014.

From I.B. Tauris

The conquest of Egypt by Islamic armies under the command of Amr ibn al-As in the seventh century transformed medieval Egyptian society. Seeking to uncover the broader cultural changes of the period by drawing on a wide array of literary and documentary sources, Maged Mikhail stresses the cultural and institutional developments that punctuated the histories of Christians and Muslims in the province under early Islamic rule. From Byzantine to Islamic Egypt traces how the largely agrarian Egyptian society responded to the influx of Arabic and Islam, the means by which the Coptic Church constructed its sectarian identity, the Islamisation of the administrative classes and how these factors converged to create a new medieval society. The result is a fascinating and essential study for scholars of Byzantine and early Islamic Egypt.

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A Companion to Seals in the Middle Ages

Submissions are sought for Brill’s A Companion to Seals in the Middle Ages.

Medieval seals were material and visual statements of identity, power, agency, and legitimacy that could operate locally or traverse great geographic expanses to assert individual or corporate authority. The importance of the seal in medieval culture cannot be underestimated. This inter-disciplinary, edited volume seeks essays analyzing seal design, production, meaning, usage and reception in the Middle Ages. As a whole, the volume will critically engage with the historiography of seals as well as highlight new approaches to understanding seals across time and space with emphasis on Europe, the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem and Byzantium c. 1100–1500. Essays therefore must include historiographical, regional and thematic explorations of medieval seals.Scholars from a range of disciplines, such as but not limited to History, Art History, Numismatics, Archaeology, Cultural and Visual Studies, are invited to contribute new and innovative examinations of select seals or seal types in context. Essays should appeal to the specialist as well as students of medieval history. Submissions are especially welcome from scholars whose work locates seals within broader developments in medieval social codes and visual or material culture.

Topics of Interest:

  • The Production of Seals
  • Ownership, Access and Usage
  • Authority, Ritual and the Practice of Sealing
  • Seals and their Documents
  • Sign Theory and Seals
  • Heraldry and Seals
  • The Body and the Seal
  • Gendering the Seal
  • dentity (individual or corporate) and the Seal
  • Seals and Foundations or Networks
  • Place and the Seal
  • The Seal and Visual Culture

Editors:
Laura J. Whatley, Ph.D.
Kendall College of Art and Design of Ferris State University

Charlotte D. Bauer, Ph.D.
University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowships, Jackman Humanities Institute, University of Toronto

The Jackman Humanities Institute (JHI) at the University of Toronto is pleased to announce Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowships designed to provide financial and intellectual support for outstanding scholars at the beginning of their professional careers. Up to three Fellows in the Humanities will be selected each year for a two-year fellowship in the JHI. Fellows will be selected on the basis of accomplishment appropriate to their stage in their career, the promise of excellence and the relevance of their research to the annual theme. The JHI interprets "Humanities" as a broad category, including political theory, interpretative social science, music, and the arts.

The theme for 2015–2016 is THINGS THAT MATTER.

Because words are the privileged medium of communication, things have long been characterized as mute. However, a focus on material culture has provided a particularly fruitful field of research in the humanities. Things bear affective, social, cultural, historical, religious, economic, and political meanings and relations. They can be traces of the past, commodities or gifts, symbols of the divine, tools, raw or natural materials, or works of art, furnishings or decorations, or merely be moved out of our way. They provide insights into how people make sense of experience and come together as societies. Whether as relics of ancient cultures or as contemporary commodities, things are at the heart of humanities disciplines. How can we make them talk? What do things tell us about societies and their histories?

The Fellows will pursue their individual research in the context of the JHI. They will have offices at the JHI and will participate in weekly seminars and other activities in the circle of fellows. In addition, each postdoctoral fellow will be affiliated with a Department and will teach one course in each Fall and Winter term of their two-year Fellowship. We are especially interested in candidates who have an interest in and capacity for interdisciplinary work of a high quality. The Fellowship provides an annual $50,000 Canadian stipend.

Bard Graduate Center Research Fellowship

The Bard Graduate Center invites scholars from university, museum, and independent backgrounds with a PhD or equivalent professional experience to apply for funded research fellowships, to be held during the 2015–2016 academic year.  The fellowships are intended to fund collections-based research at the BGC or elsewhere in New York, as well as writing or reading projects in which being part of the BGC’s dynamic research environment is intellectually valuable.  Eligible disciplines and fields of study include—but are not limited to—art history, architecture and design history, economic and cultural history, history of technology, philosophy, anthropology, and archaeology.

The stipend rate is $3,500 per month, and housing is available. Both long- and short-term fellowships are available (for example, 6, 4 and 2 months). The timing of dates will be negotiated with individual awardees. Fellows will be given a workspace in the BGC Research Center at 38 West 86th Street, between Columbus Avenue and Central Park West, in New York City.

The BGC is a graduate research institute devoted to study of the decorative arts, design history, and material culture, drawing on methodologies and approaches from art history, economic and cultural history, history of technology, philosophy, anthropology, and archaeology. It offers MA and PhD degrees, possesses a specialized library of 60,000 volumes exclusive of serials, and publishes West 86th: A Journal of Decorative Arts, Design History and Material Culture and Cultural Histories of the Material World (both with The University of Chicago Press), and the catalogues that accompany the four exhibitions it presents every year in its Gallery space (with Yale University Press). Over 50 research seminars, lectures and symposia are scheduled annually and are live-streamed around the world on the BGC’s YouTube channel.

Israel Antiquities Authority National Treasures Website

The Israel Antiquities Authority has created the National Treasures Online website, which offers a selection of thousands of objects from the collections of the National Treasures. The site, which currently has over 5000 artifacts, is updated continuously, and new hi-resolution images of artifacts and information are added on a regular basis. The site includes photography and information about the collections in the Rockefeller Archaeological Museum.

50 GODDARD AVE
BROOKLINE, MA 02445
617-850-1242
mjcbac@hchc.edu

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THE MARY JAHARIS CENTER
for Byzantine Arts and Culture

Founded in 2010 through a generous gift from the Jaharis Family Foundation, the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture is dedicated to the promotion and advancement of knowledge about the rich heritage of Byzantine art and culture.

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